CHAPTER 1 PERCEPTIONS OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION STUDENTS AS TO WHY THEY CANNOT FINISH THEIR BACHELORS DEGREE INTRODUCTION Hundreds of students have successfully finished their studies, but there are a few who have failed to finish their degrees. Some of them failed and decided to pursue a job without gaining a degree. However, little is known about the factors affecting the success or failure of students. Prior study on this subject showed that the adaptation of students in college was a complicated process.

It involved personal, academic, social, and cultural aspects. Some of them experienced culture shock, lack of social supports, difficulties in their adjustment to being a college student, low self-confidence, and low satisfaction with interactions to other student or their professors. Most of them also reported facing problems due to lack of general knowledge prior to coming to college, adjustment to campus customs and norms, verbal and nonverbal communication with society, and difficulty in making social contacts inside or outside their social academic environment.

In the academic setting, they faced three interrelated major problems, a different university system, student society, and the student-professor relationship. It is likely that students experience different problems in finishing their degree and different ways in handling these said problems. Understanding the factors that facilitate or impede learning and adjustment is essential. The degree of difficulty in approaching these problems depends on the students’ preparedness, motivation and their ability to adapt.

Of considerable importance also are the facilities provided for them by the universities as well as students’ knowledge about and attitudes towards them. Failure to overcome adjustment problems can lead to other problems, not only for the students themselves but also for the institutions where they study. BACKGROUND OF THE STUDY After graduating from high school, students are now off to the next step in their educational career. Whether they have decided to attend a public state college or a private university, there are many things that students need to be wary about, otherwise, they will not be able to finish their studies.

Most students who have recently graduated are around sixteen to eighteen years old. And because people in today’s society consider teenagers, especially eighteen year olds as adults by legal means, many newly graduates from highschool failed to see that they are still inexperienced in the real world. And so they make many foolish choices in their early years of college and become trapped into one of many of life’s pitfalls. One of the most common examples of this is the newly begotten responsibility of the college schedule.

From elementary to high school, a schedule is already created for the student to follow and is expected for the student to attend everyday the school is open. In college the idea of a schedule is completely different. In college, the classes don’t always repeat every day but are usually on a Monday-Wednesday-Friday or a Tuesday-Thursday schedule. And some of the professors also don’t usually make it mandatory to attend the classes to pass the class. All that needs to be done is doing all the homework, quizzes, tests and the final exam which results in them being arrogant and believing they can skip their classes and still pass the class.

Another pitfall students can fall into is the partying. Some students have their own place, others are part of fraternities or sororities, but one thing is common among most of them. They love to party or hang out with their peers. Because they attend so many parties and gatherings, they slowly ignore their school responsibilities and begin to start failing their classes one by one. A third common trap that many students fall into is the obsession of some hobby (or vices) with the most common one being computer games and gambling.

Because most students have access to their own schedule and allowance, they begin to take up on hobbies that take up all their time and money and become totally obsessed in it. There are many problems that may arise and become distractions for students who have just entered the adult world. They are inexperienced, easily manipulated and foolish to begin with. To prevent these from happening, it is up to the student himself, or the parent or guardian to try to prevent these from happening. It is a must for a student to understand his responsibilities, realize his limitations, and learn the meaning of discipline.

STATEMENT OF THE PROBLEM This study intends to determine the reasons why students could not finish their degree as perceived by the students themselves. Specifically, this study seeks to answer the following queries: 1. What problems hinder the students from finishing their degree? 2. How does the students handle and approach these said problems? HYPOTHESIS This study tends to test the following hypotheses: 1. Many factors such as financial stability, emotional and mental capacity, and physical health, may directly affect the students on their journey towards attaining a degree. . The degree of difficulty in handling these factors may vary from one student to another depending on their current situations. SIGNIFICANCE OF THE STUDY: 1. This study will be a significant endeavor for the enhancement of strategies to be used by students to confront the problems that they encounter in pursuing their degree. In order to carry this out, certain information will be collected on: a) the students’ personal, academic, social, and cultural background; b) the academic, social, emotional, and cultural problems faced; and c) the coping strategies developed. . On the basics of the foregoing, to recommend a number of ways to facilitate the adjustment process of students in college, and; 3. Suggest ways to assist these students with regards to these constraints. SCOPE AND DELIMITATION This study intends to investigate the reasons why some students could not attain their degree. For this study, primary research will be conducted using questionnaires that will be sent to the Business Administration students of the National College of Business and Arts in Taytay, Rizal. The questionnaires will be used to collect quantitative data.

In connection to the previous discussion, other key assumptions and limitations were also considered: · Are the results valid? · Was the data relevant to the research questions? · Were the data collection methods appropriate for the research objectives? · Was the data collection comprehensive enough? · Were the data appropriately analyzed and the findings adequately corroborated? DEFINITION OF OPERATIONAL TERMS To facilitate better understanding of the study, the following terms are operationally defined: Academic …………………… ny matter of, relating to, or associated with an academy or school. Constraints ………………… the state of being checked, restricted, or compelled to avoid some action. Customs and Norms …… a usage or practice common to many or to a particular place or class or habitual to an individual. Degree ……………………….. a title conferred on students by a college, university, or professional school on completion of a program of study or course. Emotional Capacity …….. in this study, this refers to a student’s state of feeling and sensibilities.

Financial Stability ………. strength to stand or endure changing and fluctuating state of money matters. Psychological Capacity … or Mental Capacity, in this study, this refers to the strength and capability of a student regarding matters of the mind, such as intelligence and IQ. Physical Capacity ………… a student’s physical well-being, condition, or health. Social Capacity …………….. a student’s ability to mingle with his co-students, his professors, his peers, his family and the society where he is associated. Vices……………………………. practice or a habit considered immoral, depraved, and/or degrading in the associated society. CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK This simple paradigm illustrates the conceptual framework of this study. THEORETICAL FRAMEWORK While existing studies points to many factors such as problems in the family, inadequate school facilities, bad influences by friends, unfair treatment from professors, low intelligence, unability to mingle with co-students, vices, and lack of student assistance, that directly affects the students in their journey to finish their studies, there is nonetheless a scarcity of research on these particular issues.

For this reason, the society and the students themselves are unaware of the best way to approach these problems. To address this, this particular study was conducted to specifically explore the factors affecting or constraining the students’ journey towards attaining their degree and to identify the relationships between these factors and the students’ current practices in managing these said constraints. CHAPTER 2 Review of Related Literature FOREIGN LITERATURE RESOURCE MANUAL FOR INTERVENTION AND REFERRAL SERVICES (I;RS) Revised October 2005 Reprinted September 2007

INTRODUCTION OVERVIEW The New Jersey State Board of Education has established that the primary mission of schools is to enhance student achievement of high academic standards in safe and disciplined learning environments. The effectiveness of public education in fulfilling this mission depends largely upon the capacity of school systems to respond to the diverse educational needs of students. Constantly evolving social conditions and the changing educational needs that tend to emerge with these changes can pose dramatic barriers to student achievement.

The educational mission is made more complex by the increased incidence, prevalence and intensity of problems students bring to schools. These problems include high risk behaviors, such as alcohol,tobacco and other drug abuse, violence, vandalism, child abuse and neglect, early sexual involvement, youth pregnancies and parenting, suicide attempts and suicides, eating disorders, low self-regard, poor socialization skills, lack of readiness for school, as well as chronic medical conditions and physical disabilities.

The types of at-risk behaviors students manifest while in school include not concentrating or focusing on learning, not completing assignments, not achieving to demonstrated skill level or tested potential, declining or failing grades, cheating, absenteeism, tardiness, falling asleep, inability to stay in seat or work within structure, decreased participation, self-defeating responses to peer pressure, deteriorating personal appearance and hygiene, erratic behavior, loss of affect, acting out, fighting, defying authority, violating rules and dropping out of school.

These and other problems place students at risk for school failure and other problems, leaving parents and teachers frustrated and in need of assistance. In response to these circumstances and the attendant needs of students, the New Jersey Department of Education continues to provide leadership to schools for educational improvement and whole-school reform. One such effort to be addressed in this manual is the school’s program of intervention and referral services (I;RS). Plight of Fil-Am HS students in US By Esther Misa Chavez INQUIRER. net First Posted 09:01:00 11/17/2008

Filed Under: Youth, Migration, Education SAN FRANCISCO, CA: The Philippine American Press Club (PAPC) USA, partnered with the National Federation of Filipino American Associations (NaFFAA), tackled pressing problems besetting Filipino American students from K-12 in the American public school system. In the PAPC’s quarterly Kapihan at the West Bay Pilipino Multi-Center in the heart of South of Market, concerns of local schools in Seattle and San Francisco had been developed into full-blown research on how students are coping in ten major cities with large Filipino populations.

The center and a public school nearby might just as well have been ground zero for Filipino students coping in an inner city setting and its socio-cultural and economic factors. The Bessie Carmichael Elementary School/Filipino Education Center with a 52% Filipino student population is lucky to have a Filipino principal who understands both the negative and positive influences affecting his students. Jeffrey Burgos, principal for the past five years, empathized with the group’s concerns but also stated that the findings were not atypical of Filipinos but applied to all the ethnics.

In the panel to discuss the “High Drop-out Rate and Low Performance of FilAm Students” was a mix of academicians and community advocates: Jeffrey Burgos; Hydra Mendoza, San Francisco Mayor Gavin Newsom’s education adviser; Thelma Boac, principal of Silver Creek High School in San Jose; Ruby Munoz, Alameda Commissioner for the early childhood education program Head Start; Rodel Rodis, member of the City College board; and Anthony Barretto Ogilvie, Ed. D, executive dean of Continuing and Professional Education, Seattle Central Community College.

Moderators were Henni Espinosa of ABS-CBN Channel Network and Rudy Asercion, executive director of West Bay. The most pressing issue was how to alleviate the problem of dropouts and, even more compelling, the high suicide incidence among FilAm high school students. Not only are there academic challenges to consider; there too are emotional and physical growth, social values, peer pressure, economics and language difficulties that strain student performance. Johanna Navarro, a psychologist in the audience, recommended the development of intervention projects to help the students.

Hydra Mendoza and Burgos said such programs are in place, but school environment, the home and parenting are major factors too. Someone recalled, “It takes a village to educate a child. ” How wise were our forebears in the Philippines where extended families keep an eye on all the children, making sure that they toe the line and adhere to the family dream of a better future through the best education possible. But the reality is that we are now in America, where the family ties are not as strong, even fragmented.

With more urgent needs like putting food on the table and a roof over their heads dislodging the dream of a better tomorrow, education plays second fiddle. With monetary concerns to the fore, even the aspirations of students are focused on where it’s easier to excel and bring the best returns, like nursing. Rocket scientist? Doctor? Electrical Engineering? Law? Politics? Journalism? No, nursing. The study also brought to light that these problems are not new. Filipino students have had them for decades. It was also found that the newer immigrant students excelled more than the children who’ve stayed longer or were born in America.

Is Americanization of the Pinoy a factor? Perhaps. Meanwhile, here are NaFFAA’s findings in a study of Filipino American K-12 public school students in a ten city/area-study – Chicago, Honolulu/Hawaii, Jersey City, Las Vegas, Los Angeles, Miami, New York City, San Diego, San Francisco and Seattle – on a grant from the Wells Fargo Foundation, with Dr. Tony Ogilvie as national research project coordinator. 1. In the four city/areas of Jersey City, Miami, New York City and San Diego, Filipino public school students are doing well. 2.

In two city/areas of Chicago and Las Vegas, Filipino students appear to be doing well academically, but indicators suggest existing or pending problems. 3. The city/areas of Honolulu, Los Angeles, San Francisco and Seattle were noted to clearly have significant academic deficiencies among Filipino students. 4. In spite of the good news of exemplary Filipino academic achievement in most city/areas, in California are low numbers of Filipino students going to college and dropping out early, high suicide rates among Filipino teenage girls, and many Filipino teens feeling excessive parental pressure to succeed. . The lack of disaggregated statistical data on Filipino students in five city/areas must be addressed in order to verify the assessments based on interviews. 6. The significant academic deficiencies in city/areas where there have been three to four generations of Filipino immigrants and the additional bad news in California are in sharp contract with the avowed high value placed on education by Filipino parents and Philippine culture.

Countervailing pressures in American society may be influential in shaping Filipino K-12 student performance. 7. There are a number of university-based programs aimed at recruiting, supporting and retaining Filipino students, but community-based programs serving Filipino youths are for the most part essentially conducted with volunteers. This national study suggests that Filipino students in American public schools are not being adequately prepared for high-demand, high-skills jobs in the current workplace environment.

Recognizing that not all future jobs require college education and that not all Filipino students need to go to college there is agreement among those who participated in the study that if the national Filipino student academic performance is not improved and sustained, the Filipino community will feel the negative consequences locally and nationally. These results of an initial research project call urgently for more detailed research and analysis towards taking steps in the coming years to ensure a brighter future for all Filipino students regardless of where they reside and whether they attend public or private schools.

Study Implications One can look at the national picture of Filipino students in the K-12 public school system as a glass that is half-full or half-empty. There are areas where Filipino students are succeeding academically. But there are also high numbers of Filipinos doing poorly, especially in cities and areas where the Filipino community has been around for 100 years or more. In these areas one may find the local school district responding inadequately to the critical needs of first- generation immigrant students and students who have become fully “Americanized. These have become less academically achieving and may soon be caught in the insidious cycle of poverty, becoming permanent members of the low-educated and low-skilled group vying for low-paying jobs. The research group expressed several concerns: • Insufficient advanced academic preparation leading to a lack of sustainability and ascendancy in the careers of young Filipinos in the workplace, thereby diminishing their preparation for national and global economies. Filipino youth unable to participate in higher level jobs with higher incomes. • Minimum involvement of Filipino parents and community members in their local school system due to past historical tradition and practices resulting in Filipino student needs going unheeded. • The low number of Filipinos going on to higher education and graduating, especially in teacher education, creating an anemic pool of future Filipino teachers to cope with serious deficiencies in the school system. If not reversed, the “colonial mentality” that still persists in both Filipino adults and youth will make it all the more difficult to reverse the pattern of low academic achievement afflicting Filipino students in the K-12 public school system. Recognizing that the K-12 Filipino student academic situation cannot be left to resolve itself, the group researchers recommended urgent action at several levels – the school system, the Filipino community and the Filipino parents School System 1. Data by sub-ethnic group (e. g. Filipinos) must be separated immediately; otherwise the problems of these groups will remain invisible and their issues and problems left to worsen. Board members and K-12 school districts administrators are asked to seriously consider the following actions: 1. Hire more Filipino administrators, teachers and counselors to ensure staff that can deal appropriately with the challenges and problems Filipino students encounter in the school system daily. 2. Revise and infuse the existing curriculum with Filipino culture, history and experiential content. 3. Provide other educators with training that introduces them to Filipino ulture, history, practices and skills enabling them to work more effectively with Filipino students. 4. Involve Filipino community members and parents in the school’s daily operations and special programs; this can be done in coalition with other ethnic groups when the opportunities arise. 5. Place Filipino educators in leadership and succession positions. Filipino Community Filipino communities across the nation are strongly urged to: 1. Provide education leadership training for parents and students to enable them to look at the education system critically and engage school personnel in pro-active dialogue and actions. 2.

Encourage and facilitate parental involvement in the local school system. 3. In addition to providing scholarships, conduct academic support and other programs for their youth that foster academic achievement. 4. Prepare an inventory of existing organizations, programs, and resources to assist Filipino youth who need academic and personal help. 5. Join other ethnic groups in forming coalitions that push and promote better responsiveness to community needs by the school system. 6. Conduct highly visible activities that promote awareness of the Filipino community in other sectors of the community (business, government, education).

Filipino Parents The National Filipino Study group also urges Filipino parents to the following: 1. Learn how the American school system works and critically assess what the school is doing for their children. 2. Increase involvement in their children’s education by participating in school activities and programs, especially advocating on their children’s behalf. 3. Know where their children are – both in terms of physical location and use of the Internet (MySpace, YouTube). 4. Continue to encourage high performance in school and at the same time support their children in times of success and difficulty outside of school. . Collaborate with parents from other ethnic communities in ensuring that the school system meets the needs of all students. LOCAL LITERATURE Education in the Philippines From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia During the period of colonialization by the United States, Education in the Philippines changed radically, modelled on the system of Education in the United States of the time. After the Second World War, changes in the US system were no longer automatically reflected in the Philippines, which has since moved in various directions of its own.

Filipino children may enter public school at about age four, starting from Nursery up to Kindergarten. At about seven years of age, children enter elementary school (6 to 7 years). This may be followed by secondary school (4 years). Students may then sit for College Entrance Examinations (CEE), after which they may enter tertiary institutions (3 to 5 years). Other types of schools do exist, such as Private schools, Preparatory schools, International schools, Laboratory High Schools and Science High Schools.

Several ethnic groups, including Chinese, British, Americans, and Japanese operate their own schools. Elementary schooling is compulsory, but 24% of Filipinos of the relevant age group do not attend, usually due to absence of any school in their area, education being offered in foreign languages only, or financial distress. In July 2009 DepEd acted to overcome the foreign language problem by ordering all elementary schools to move towards mother-tongue based learning initially. The order allows two alternative three-year bridging plans.

Depending on the bridging plan adopted, the Filipino and English languages are to be phased in as the language of instruction for other subjects beginning in the third and fourth grades. Secondary schooling is recommended, but is not compulsory, and is of four years duration only. The school year in the Philippines starts in June of one year and ends in March of the next, with a two-month summer break for April and May, one week of semestral break (the last week of October), and a week or two of Christmas break.

In 2005, the Philippines spent only about US$138 per pupil compared to US$1,582 in Singapore, US$3,728 in Japan, and US$852 in Thailand. Concerning the standard of education in the Philippines, in June 2009 the president of the Federation of Accrediting Agencies of the Philippines (FAAP) cited the Congressional Commission on Education (EDCOM) lamenting ‘a continuing decline in the quality of education in this country’. He said this was due to four main factors: ‘a) mismanagement of the educational system, b) not investing wisely in education, c) lack of management competencies, d) systemic corruption’.

Another reason why the Philippines is not a major supplier of tertiary education for overseas students in the region is because three semesters of each eight semester bachelor degree are required to be completely devoted to government mandated subjects. These mandated subjects include the life and works of Filipino national hero Dr Jose Rizal, three subjects of Filipino language, and basic mathematics, science, and Filipino cultural subjects more appropriate for senior high school than for tertiary level. Philippine Literature

Philippine is a country rich in diversity and language heritage. Even before Spanish colonization, its literature had evolved tremendously. Some of the notable literatures are a general reflection of the influence exerted by Spaniards during the colonization of Philippine. During pre-colonial times, there has been widespread evidence that the island inhabitants display a culture rich with traditions. Folk speeches, folk songs and indigenous rituals are part of their daily lives. The infusion of such elements represents a lifestyle deeply ingrained in the locals.

An understanding on the history of Philippine literature will allow us to appreciate the literary riches of this nation. The colonization by Spain did not subject literature development to a halt. Rather, it breathed a different kind of life into the local literary works. European civilization was imbued into the local traditions through religion and institutions. During that period of time, performing theaters were introduced and the local languages experienced enrichment. Much later, Spain brought about liberal ideas and a sense of internationalism to the people of Philippines.

Similar to the period of renaissance, it has substantial influence on local intellectuals. They start to question and portray the meanings of “liberty and freedom” in their works. The history of Philippine literature demonstrates that the combination of realism and surrealism gives rise to some of the greatest Philippines literature today. 19th century marks a change in the literary development when Filipino intellectuals educated in Europe wrote about colonization and the associated downsides. This realization brought about a reformation movement which eventually led to the downfall of the Spanish colonial.

The history of Philippine literature was once again marked by a change when English was introduced. The introduction of English language led to the slow demise of Spanish, and subsequently literature written in Spanish. The sustaining use of English language birthed some of the well known English poems, short stories and once again enriched the local literature in a unique way. Upon examination, we will discover that Philippine literature encompasses a way of life and values cherished by the locals. The local literature is a uniting element among its people, and will continue to evolve as enriched by modern changes.

Philippine Literature Philippine is a country rich in diversity and language heritage. Even before Spanish colonization, its literature had evolved tremendously. Some of the notable literatures are a general reflection of the influence exerted by Spaniards during the colonization of Philippine. During pre-colonial times, there has been widespread evidence that the island inhabitants display a culture rich with traditions. Folk speeches, folk songs and indigenous rituals are part of their daily lives. The infusion of such elements represents a lifestyle deeply ingrained in the locals.

An understanding on the history of Philippine literature will allow us to appreciate the literary riches of this nation. The colonization by Spain did not subject literature development to a halt. Rather, it breathed a different kind of life into the local literary works. European civilization was imbued into the local traditions through religion and institutions. During that period of time, performing theaters were introduced and the local languages experienced enrichment. Much later, Spain brought about liberal ideas and a sense of internationalism to the people of Philippines.

Similar to the period of renaissance, it has substantial influence on local intellectuals. They start to question and portray the meanings of “liberty and freedom” in their works. The history of Philippine literature demonstrates that the combination of realism and surrealism gives rise to some of the greatest Philippines literature today. 19th century marks a change in the literary development when Filipino intellectuals educated in Europe wrote about colonization and the associated downsides. This realization brought about a reformation movement which eventually led to the downfall of the Spanish colonial.

The history of Philippine literature was once again marked by a change when English was introduced. The introduction of English language led to the slow demise of Spanish, and subsequently literature written in Spanish. The sustaining use of English language birthed some of the well known English poems, short stories and once again enriched the local literature in a unique way. Upon examination, we will discover that Philippine literature encompasses a way of life and values cherished by the locals. The local literature is a uniting element among its people, and will continue to evolve as enriched by modern changes.

CHAPTER 3 RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODOLOGY The study was conducted by the researchers was a “causal-comparative” method. The researchers attempted to investigate possible cause-and-effect relationships by observing some existing consequences and looking back through the data for plausible causal factors. To be able to determine and finally suggest possible solution and prevention on the problems that may arise among students and may cause them to be unable to finish their degree, it is essential to know first if the students realize the possible reasons behind this. RESEARCH METHOD

The researcher for this study conducted the method of sample survey. Sample survey is a type of investigation wherein only a representative group of people were chosen from a particular “population” which is available. This had aided the researcher in gathering more information on the perception of the Business Administration students of NCBA Taytay regarding why students could not finish their degree in college. RESEARCH INSTRUMENT The survey questionnaire was the main instrument used in gathering data as well as books, internet, dictionaries, encyclopedias, and news papers.

This was prepared by the researchers to get the necessary and/or pertinent information to complete this study. They made sure that the questionnaire is clear and understandable by the respondents (students). Through this, researchers were able to gather information. RESEARCH LOCALE The research was conducted within the premises of National College of Business and Arts located at Ilog Pugad, Barangay San Juan, Taytay Rizal, where all of our respondents were available. The researchers decided to conduct their research within the area for their convenience and for the respondents as well.

POPULATION UNIVERSE AND SAMPLING PROCEDURE Our respondents are the Business Administration students of the National College of Business and Arts Taytay Campus for the 2nd semester of the school year 2009 – 2010. The selected subjects comprised of students from 1st year to 4th year college. In conducting sample group, the researchers have chosen 200 Business Administration students as respondents in this study. These individuals were carefully examined by the researchers and taken into considerations of their specific characteristics.

The researchers made use of the simple random sampling procedure in order to allow equal opportunities for the students selected in this study. TREATMENT OF DATA The researchers used simple statistics to analyze the gathered data. All retrieved questionnaires were tallied and tabulated for the interpretation and analysis of the data. The researchers arrived at their number of the respondents by using the formula: FORMULA: P= f ———–X 200 N The frequency distribution was determined and the computations of the percentage were done.

The formula was designed where Percentage (P) is equal to Frequency (F) over the number of respondents (N) times 200 to be able to determine the actual percentage of the respondents response and enable them to make a concrete conclusions about the problem presented in this study. RESEARCH PROCEDURE The researchers followed these steps and procedures in gathering data. The following steps are listed below: 1. The researchers have chosen 200 Business Administration students who were enrolled in National College of Business and Arts Taytay branch for the school year 2009 – 2010 second semester as respondents. . Preparation of research instrument within a week of the research process. 3. Preparation of the research instrument (questionnaire). 4. Retrieval of the research instrument. 5. Calculating and tabulating the gathered data for treatment and analysis. 6. Gathering additional data from the internet and other sources. 7. Finalization of the findings. RESPONDENTS PROFILE TABLE A Frequency Distribution of Respondents According to year level YEAR LEVEL| FREQUENCY| PERCENTAGE| 1st year| 54| 27 %| 2nd year| 66| 33 %| 3rd year| 42| 21 %| 4th year| 38| 19 %| TOTAL| 200| 100 %|

TABLE B Frequency Distribution of Respondents According to Major MAJOR| FREQUENCY| PERCENTAGE| HRDM| 26| 13 %| MKTG| 21| 10. 5 %| MGT| 59| 29. 5 %| MM| 38| 19 %| FM| 37| 18. 5 %| MA| 11| 5. 5 %| BF| 1| . 5 %| OM| 7| 3. 5 %| TOTAL| 200| 100 %| CHAPTER 4 SELECTION OF THE RESPONDENTS The researchers of this study has conducted investigation from a group of students from the Business Administration Department of the National College of Business and Arts, Taytay Rizal. The subjects comprised of 200 respondents who ranged from first year to fourth year college.

This number is sufficient enough to proceed with the study. The proponents decided to conduct the research inside the school area for it is easily accessible to both the researchers and the respondents. PRESENTATION ANALYSIS OF DATA This is the analysis and interpretation of the data gathered from the respondents and resulting from the research questions in this study. Each question coming from the survey questionairre has its own table so that the researchers can present and analyze clearly the data gathered from the study.

The tables and the interpretations are as follows: TABLE 1 Frequency and percentage of the Respondents regarding whether they have problems with their grades. RESPONSE| FREQUENCY| PERCENTAGE| 1. ALWAYS| 20| 10 %| 2. SOMETIMES| 125| 62. 5 %| 3. SELDOM| 27| 13. 5 %| 4. NEVER| 28| 14 %| TOTAL| 200| 100 %| This table indicates that 20 respondents or 10% said that they always have problems with their grades, 125 respondents or 62. 5% said that sometimes they have problems with their grades, 27 respondents or 13. 5% said that they eldom have problems with their grades, and 28 respondents or 14% never had problems with their grades. TABLE 2 Frequency and Percentage of Respondents regarding “if they are convinced that they will finish their course on time. ” RESPONSE| FREQUENCY| PERCENTAGE| 1. AGREE| 93| 46. 5 %| 2. STRONGLY AGREE| 75| 37. 5 %| 3. DISAGREE| 24| 12 %| 4. STRONGLY DISAGREE| 8| 4 %| TOTAL| 200| 100 %| This table indicates that 93 respondents (46. 5%) claimed that they are convinced that they will be able to finish their degree on time, 75 respondents (37. %) strongly agreed that they will be able to finish their degree on time, 24 respondents (12%) disagreed that they are convinced that they will be able to finish their degree on time, and 8 respondents (4%) strongly disagreed that they will be able to finish their degree on time. TABLE 3 Frequency and Percentage of Respondents regarding their most basic reason for taking up their course. RESPONSE| FREQUENCY| PERCENTAGE| 1. PERSONAL CHOICE| 114| 57 %| 2. PARENT’S CHOICE| 44| 22 %| 3. PEER PRESSURE| 14| 7 %| 4. RANDOM CHOICE| 28| 14 %| TOTAL| 200| 100 %| This table indicates that 114 respondents (57%) claimed that they personally ecided to take up their course, 44 respondents (22%) claimed that it was their parents who decided on what course they would take up, 14 respondents (7%) claimed that they have chosen their course out of peer pressure, and 28 respondents (14%) claimed that they have chosen their course randomly because they were undecided on what course to take. TABLE 4 Frequency and Percentage of Respondents regarding whether their course really fits them. RESPONSE| FREQUENCY| PERCENTAGE| 1. AGREE| 120| 60 %| 2. STRONGLY AGREE| 50| 25 %| 3. DISAGREE| 27| 13. 5 %| 4. STRONGLY DISAGREE| 3| 1. 5 %| TOTAL| 200| 100 %|

This table indicates that 120 respondents (60%) agreed that their course suits them just fine, 50 respondents (25%) strongly agreed that their course really fits them, 27 respondents (13. 5%) disagreed and believes that they should have taken up another course instead, and 3 respondents (1. 5%) strongly disagreed and perceives that another course would have suited them better. TABLE 5 Frequency and Percentage of the Respondents regarding whether it is right to take their studies seriously. RESPONSE| FREQUENCY| PERCENTAGE| 1. AGREE| 88| 44 %| 2. STRONGLY AGREE| 99| 49. 5 %| 3. DISAGREE| 10| 5 %| . STRONGLY DISAGREE| 3| 1. 5 %| TOTAL| 200| 100 %| This table indicates that 88 respondents (44%) agreed that it is right to take their studies seriously, 99 respondents (49. 5%) strongly agreed that it is right to take their studies seriously, 10 respondents (5%) disagreed and think that they should take their studies a little less seriously, and 3 respondents (1. 5%) strongly disagreed and believed that their studies does not deserve any serious attention. TABLE 6 Frequency and Percentage of the Respondents regarding whether their parents know their schedule and ask about their studies.

RESPONSE| FREQUENCY| PERCENTAGE| 1. ALWAYS| 73| 36. 5 %| 2. SOMETIMES| 90| 45 %| 3. SELDOM| 23| 11. 5 %| 4. NEVER| 14| 7 %| TOTAL| 200| 100 %| This table indicates that 73 respondents (36. 5%) claimed that their parents always know their schedule and ask about their studies, 90 respondents (45%) claimed that their parents sometimes know their schedule and ask about their studies, 23 respondents (11. 5%) claimed that their parents seldom know their schedule and seldom ask about their studies, and 14 respondents (7%) claimed that their parents never know their schedule and never ask about their studies.

TABLE 7 Frequency and Percentage of the Respondents Regarding whether they consider that being a working student can affect their studies. RESPONSE| FREQUENCY| PERCENTAGE| 1. ALWAYS| 40| 20 %| 2. SOMETIMES| 114| 57 %| 3. SELDOM| 29| 14. 5 %| 4. NEVER| 17| 8. 5 %| TOTAL| 200| 100 %| This table indicates that 40 respondents (20%) claimed that they always consider that being a working student can affect their studies, 114 respondents (57%) sometimes consider that being a working student can affect their studies, 29 respondents (14. %) claimed that they seldom consider that being a working student can affect their studies, and 17 respondents (8. 5%) never considers that being a working student can affect their studies. TABLE 8 Frequency and Percentage of the Respondents Regarding whether being stressed can be a reason for them to drop their subject. RESPONSE| FREQUENCY| PERCENTAGE| 1. AGREE| 56| 28 %| 2. STRONGLY AGREE| 41| 20. 5 %| 3. DISAGREE| 72| 36 %| 4. STRONGLY DISAGREE| 31| 15. 5 %| TOTAL| 200| 100%| This table indicates that 56 respondents (28%) agreed that being stressed can be a reason to drop their subject, 41 respondents (20. %) strongly agreed that being stressed can be a reason to drop their subjects, 72 respondents (36%) disagreed that being stressed can be a reason to drop their subjects, and 31 respondents (15. 5%) strongly disagreed that being stressed can be a reason to drop their subjects. TABLE 9 Frequency and Percentage of the Respondents Regarding Whether their vices affect their studies. RESPONSE| FREQUENCY| PERCENTAGE| 1. AGREE| 64| 32 %| 2. STRONGLY AGREE| 55| 27. 5 %| 3. DISAGREE| 58| 29| 4. STRONGLY DISAGREE| 23| 11. 5 %| TOTAL| 200| 100 %|

This table indicates that 64 respondents (32%) agreed that vices affect their studies, 55 respondents (27. 5%) strongly agreed that vices affect their studies, 58 respondents (29%) disagreed that vices affect their studies, and 23 respondents (11. 5%) strongly disagreed that vices affect their studies. TABLE 10 Frequency and Percentage of the Respondents Regarding Whether their friends can be a bad influence to them in their studies. RESPONSE| FREQUENCY| PERCENTAGE| 1. AGREE| 60| 30 %| 2. STRONGLY AGREE| 20| 10 %| 3. DISAGREE| 88| 44 %| 4. STRONGLY DISAGREE| 32| 16 %| TOTAL| 200| 100 %|

This table indicates that 60 respondents (30%) agreed that their friends can be a bad influence to them in their studies, 20 respondents (10%) strongly agreed to this too. 88 respondents (44%) disagreed and denied that their friends can be a bad influence, and 32 respondents (16%) strongly disagreed and believes that their friends can never influence them badly in any way towards their studies. TABLE 11 Frequency and Percentage of Respondents Regarding Whether entering a relationship can be a distraction to their studies. RESPONSE| FREQUENCY| PERCENTAGE| 1. AGREE| 56| 28 %| 2. STRONGLY AGREE| 33| 16. 5 %| 3. DISAGREE| 72| 36 %| . STRONGLY DISAGREE| 39| 19. 5 %| TOTAL| 200| 100 %| This table indicates that 56 respondents (28%) agreed that entering a relationship can be a distraction to their studies, and 33 respondents (16. 5%) strongly agreed to this. 72 respondents (36%) disagreed and believed that not in any way can entering a relationship serve as a distraction, and 39 respondents (19. 5%) strongly disagreed and felt that relationships can not affect their studies. TABLE 12 Frequency and Percentage of Respondents regarding whether their class performance is affected by their relationship with their professor. RESPONSE| FREQUENCY| PERCENTAGE| 1.

AGREE| 65| 32. 5 %| 2. STRONGLY AGREE| 53| 26. 5 %| 3. DISAGREE| 61| 30. 5 %| 4. STRONGLY DISAGREE| 21| 10. 5 %| TOTAL| 200| 100 %| This table indicates that 65 respondents (32. 5%) agreed that their class performance is affected by their relationship with their professor, and 53 respondents (26. 5%) strongly agreed to this too. 61 respondents (30. 5%) disagreed and felt that personal relationships even with their own professor has no connection to their class performance, and 21 respondents (10. 5%) strongly disagreed and believed that in no way will their class functions be affected with how they treat their professor and otherwise.

TABLE 13 Frequency and Percentage of Respondents regarding what they think is mostly the reason of those students who were not able to finish their degree. RESPONSE| FREQUENCY| PERCENTAGE| 1. FINANCIAL CAPACITY| 121| 60. 5 %| 2. EMOTIONAL CAPACITY| 22| 11 %| 3. MENTAL CAPACITY| 35| 17. 5 %| 4. SOCIAL CAPACITY| 22| 11 %| TOTAL| 200| 100 %| This table indicates that 121 respondents (60. 5%) perceived that FINANCIAL CAPACITY is mostly the reason why there are students who were not able to finish their degree, 22 respondents (11%) believed that EMOTIONAL CAPACITY is the reason, 35 respondents (17. %) felt that MENTAL CAPACITY is the cause, and 22 respondents (11%) considers that SOCIAL CAPACITY is the reason that unable some students from graduating. TABLE 14 Frequency and Percentage of Respondents regarding what they think is the mostly encountered constraint that makes it hard for them to pursue their degree. RESPONSE| FREQUENCY| PERCENTAGE| 1. FINANCIAL CONSTRAINTS| 85| 42. 5 %| 2. EMOTIONAL CONSTRAINTS| 35| 17. 5 %| 3. MENTAL CONSTRAINTS| 40| 20 %| 4. LACK OF SOCIAL SKILLS| 40| 20 %| TOTAL| 200| 100 %| This table indicates that 85 respondents (42. %) claim that Financial Constraints make it hard for them to pursue their degree, 35 respondents (17. 5%) claim that Emotional Constraints are the reason, 40 respondents (20%) claim that because of Mental Constraints, pursuing their degree is hard for them, and 40 respondents (20%) claim that their Lack of Social Skills is what makes it hard for them. TABLE 15 Frequency and Percentage of the Respondents regarding whether there is any possibility for them to be one of those students who could not finish their degree. RESPONSE| FREQUENCY| PERCENTAGE| 1.

ALWAYS| 16| 8 %| 2. SOMETIMES| 47| 23. 5 %| 3. SELDOM| 26| 13 %| 4. NEVER| 111| 55. 5 %| TOTAL| 200| 100 %| This table indicates that 16 respondents (8%) ALWAYS think that there is a possibility for them to be one of those students who could not finish their degree, 47 respondents (23. 5%) SOMETIMES think that they might not graduate, 26 respondents (13%) SELDOM thinks that it is possible that thay might not finish their studies, and 111 respondents (55. 5%) NEVER thinks of this possibility and strongly believes that they will attain their degree. CHAPTER 5

SUMMARY OF FINDINGS Based on the presentation analysis and interpretation of data (Chapter 4), the researchers came up with the following findings; 1. Most respondents claimed that financial constraints make it hard for them to attain their degree. 2. Most of the respondents sometimes considered that being a working student can affect their studies. 3. Most respondents disagreed that their friends can be a bad influence to them in their studies.. 4. Most of the respondents disagreed that entering a relationship can become distraction to their studies. . Most of the respondents agreed that vices affect their studies. 6. Most of respondents sometimes have problems with their grades. 7. Most of the respondents does not believe that being stressed can be a reason to drop their subject. 8. Most of the respondents are convinced that they will be able to finish their degree on time. 9. Most respondents claimed that they have personally chosen their course. 10. Most of the respondents claimed that their parents sometimes know their schedule and ask about their studies. CONCLUSION

Based on the findings of this study, we have concluded the following: 1. The reasons why a student is unable to attain his/her degree can be categorized into five factors and these are physical, social, emotional, mental and financial. Among this factors, financial is the most common reason. We have also proven that the difficulty in handling these said factors differ from one person to another depending on their current situations. 2. There is no or very limited student assistance services being offered by universities and institutions. 3.

We have found out that most students have problems in balancing their priorities resulting to lower or failing grades that may further cause them to be unable to finish their education. 4. Parental and guardian intervention plays a major role in the academic performance of students and their outlook towards their education. RECOMMENDATION Based on our conclusions from the from the previous page, we have come up with the following recommendations; 1. Universities and colleges can offer more student assistant jobs in order to aid in the financial needs of students.

Or they should at least search for partner companies or institutions where they can recommend their enrollees/ students who are interested to take on part time jobs. 2. Programs and events such as acquaintance parties should be encouraged by the school management in order to promote socialization and rapport among the students. 3. Students and educators has to keep in mind that not every one of us can fit into the same category, that we are all individuals, therefore, we must learn to adapt ourselves and learn the different types of approach to different types of people. 4.

The university management and educators/professors must have direct contact and active communication with their student’s parents. They must readily and regularly update and report to parents their concerns, the school activities and class performances of their children. 5. Before enrolling for college, it should be compulsory for students to attend orientation seminars and course compatibility examinations that will prepare them mentally for the next stage of their education. Also, for those students with limited budget for their education, they should opt to enroll in colleges with low tuition fees or in public universities.

SURVEY QUESTIONNAIRE Name:___________________Year:_____________ Course:__________________Major:____________ Please answer the following questions as truthfully as possible. Encircle the letter that best corresponds to your answer. 1. Do you have problems with your grades? a. Alwaysc. Seldom b. Sometimesd. Never 2. Are you convinced that you will be able to finish your degree on time? a. Agreec. Disagree b. Strongly Agreed. Strongly Disagree 3. What is your most basic reason for taking up your course? a. Personal Choicec. Peer Pressure b. Parent’s Choiced. Random Choice 4.

Does your course really fit you? a. Agreec. Disagree b. Strongly Agreed. Strongly Disagree 5. Is it right to take your studies seriously? a. Agreec. Disagree c. Strongly Agreed. Strongly Disagree 6. Does your parents know your schedule and ask about your studies? a. Alwaysc. Seldom b. Sometimesd. Never 7. Do you consider that being a working student can affect your studies? a. Alwaysc. Seldom b. Sometimesd. Never 8. Can being stressed be a reason for you to drop your subject? a. Agreec. Disagree b. Strongly Agreed. Strongly Disagree 9. Does your vices affect you studies? a. Agreec. Disagree . Strongly Agreed. Strongly Disagree 10. Can your friends be a bad influence to you and your studies? a. Agreec. Disagree b. Strongly Agreed. Strongly Disagree 11. Can entering a relationship serve as a distraction to your studies? a. Agreec. Disagree b. Strongly Agreed. Strongly Disagree 12. Is your class performance affected by your relationship with your professor? a. Agreec. Disagree b. Strongly Agreed. Strongly Disagree 13. What do you think is mostly the reason of those students who were not able to finish their degree? a. Financial Capacityc. Mental Capacity b. Emotional Capacityd.

Social Capacity 14. What constraint do you mostly encounter that makes it hard for you to pursue your degree? a. Financial Constraintsc. Mental Constraints b. Emotional Constraintsd. Lack of Social Skills 15. Is there any possibility for you to be one of those students who were not able to finish their degree? a. Alwaysc. Seldom b. Sometimesd. Never BIBLIOGRAPHY Published at Sooper Articles – Free Articles Directory http://www. sooperarticles. com Katherine Santos. “‘Every Last Thing … Everlasting’: Alice Munro and the Limits of Narrative. ” Studies in Short Fiction 29 (Fall 2005), 531-541.

Lives of Girls and Women. 2006. ERICKSON, BETTE L. , and STROMMER, DIANE W. 2005. Teaching College Freshmen. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass. LEVEY, MARC; BLANCO, MICHAEL; and JONES, W. TERRELL. 2008. How to Succeed on a Majority Campus: A Guide for Minority Students. Bel-mont, CA: Wadsworth. LOVE, PATRICK G. , and GOODSELL LOVE, ANNE. 2005. Enhancing Student Learning: Intellectual, Social, and Emotional Integration. ASHE-ERIC Higher Education Report Series 4. Washington, DC: George Washington University, Graduate School of Education and Human Development. PASCARELLA, ERNEST T. and TERENZINI, PATRICK T. 2009. How College Affects Students. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass. PAUL, ELIZABETH L. , and BRIER, SIGAL. 2005. “Friendsickness in the Transition to College: Precollege Predictors and College Adjustment Correlations. ” Journal of Counseling and Development 79:77–89. Esther Misa Chavez, INQUIRER. net First Posted 09:01:00 11/17/2008 Lucille E. Davy, Commissioner of Education; Barbara Gantwerk, Assistant Commissioner Division of Student Services; Susan B. Martz, Director Office of Educational Support Services; RESOURCE MANUAL FOR INTERVENTION AND REFERRAL SERVICES (I;RS)

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