MID TERM PROJECT Please choose one of job for this project (the job must be difference with the presentation assignment), after that: 1. Arrange job description, job analysis and job specification 2. Specify the source to get the prospective candidate 3. Specify the selection tools for the candidate (like test, etc) 4. Arranges 5 questions for each types of question (situational interview, behavioral interview, job related interview and stress interview) I. Job Description, , job analysis and job specification

Job: Dentist PURPOSE OF THE POSITION Dentists are healthcare professionals who provide preventive and restorative treatments for problems that affect the mouth and teeth. Most dentists work as self-employed practitioners in general practice, providing dental care to the public under The National Health Service (NHS) and/or privately. Others work in salaried posts within a variety of specialism in hospital dentistry, community dentistry, the armed forces, corporate practices, industry, or university teaching and research.

A general dental practitioner (GDP) typically leads a team made up of dental care professionals (DCPs) and treats a wide range of patients, from children to the elderly. TYPICAL WORK ACTIVITIES Most dentists work in dental practices where, in addition to the dentist(s), the team may include a receptionist, dental nurse, dental hygienist, dental therapist and dental technician. RESPONSIBILITIES 1. educating patients on oral healthcare; 2. examining teeth and diagnosing patients’ dental conditions by using tools such as x-rays; 3. ssessing treatment options and agreeing treatment plans with patients; 4. carrying out agreed clinical treatments such as restoring teeth affected by decay and treating gum disease; 5. maintaining patients’ dental records; 6. recruiting, training and managing staff; 7. managing budgets and maintaining stocks of equipment; 8. keeping abreast of new developments through structured continuing professional development (CPD); 9. Marketing services to potential clients. Some practices also employ practice managers so that dentists can concentrate on clinical work.

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SKILLS & KNOWLEDGE Dentists need to have knowledge of: * how to assess and diagnose dental problems * the structure and functions of the teeth, jaw and mouth * the structure and functions of the body, and general injuries and diseases of the body, especially the head and neck * injuries and diseases of the mouth * dental and oral health care methods, materials and medicines * Hygiene and sterilization procedures and first aid. PERSONAL QUALITIES Dentists need to be: * able to relate to a wide range of people * accurate * responsible * able to work well under pressure Good at problem-solving and decision-making. PHYSICAL REQUIREMENT Dentists need to have good eyesight (with or without corrective lenses) and good hand-eye co-ordination. They also need to have a good level of fitness and health, without any major back or hand problems because the work involves bending and using fine movements. WORKING CONDITION Dentists must spend long hours on their feet. They must take precautions against infectious diseases and be able to deal with tense patients. They are rewarded, however, by the prestige of their profession.

Because they often have several helpers, dentists must be able to supervise the work of others. They should also have good business sense. They must be responsible and careful professionals who can work well with their hands. Dentists usually set their own schedules. Many choose to work more than forty hours per week, including some evening and Saturday hours. Some dentists prefer a part-time schedule. usually work regular business hours, but may be required to do some evening and weekend work in offices and surgeries in places such as private practices, hospitals and community health centers.

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS In order to practice as a dentist, an approved degree in dentistry (BDS or BChD) is essential. Entry to the course usually requires high grades at A-level/Higher in chemistry, biology and physics or mathematics. The course combines academic education with theoretical and practical training in all aspects of dental practice. Courses including a pre-dental year exist for candidates without science-based A-levels or equivalents. This course normally lasts for 30 weeks and immediately precedes entry to the undergraduate degree course. It is not possible to become a dentist with an HND only.

Graduate entry to dental school is possible. A 2:1 in a science-based first degree is usually preferred. Graduate entry courses usually last for five years, but accelerated four-year courses are available for candidates with a 2:1 or better in a degree with a large element of biology or chemistry. Other graduate courses offer science foundation courses (a ‘pre-dental’ year) for suitable candidates with a non-science background. Some dental schools admit graduates in any subject as long as A-levels or Higher in sciences (including chemistry) have been passed with high grades.

Pre-entry experience of dentistry is not absolutely essential, but a few weeks of related work experience and work shadowing are looked for as evidence of your motivation. It is usually essential for candidates to demonstrate potential in the following skills and attributes, which will be assessed at admissions interviews: 1. strong academic ability; 2. self-discipline; 3. commitment to completing this long and demanding degree course; 4. manual dexterity and technical dental skills, plus the ability to maintain intense concentration for prolonged periods; 5. he ability to build relationships with patients and colleagues; 6. high level communication and interpersonal skills, for interaction with patients of all ages and backgrounds; 7. an interest in the welfare of others and a sympathetic manner; 8. good administrative and managerial abilities; 9. Information technology skills, due to the increasing use of computers for keeping records and accounts, and for digital imaging of radiographs and intra-oral photography. 10. It is also important that you have good eyesight.

When treating patients, dentists wear a tunic, surgical gloves and safety glasses for protection and to reduce the risk of cross-infection. Dentists may experience eye-strain and neck and back fatigue. All dentists must abide by a professional code of ethics. They may experience high stress levels when handling patients’ pain and anxiety and/or as a result of working within strict time schedules. If you work in a hospital, long days and nights on duty may limit your social life, and short contracts of employment may mean repeated job search and relocation. Education and Training Requirements

You need six to eight years of training after high school before you can work as a dentist. You must complete two to four years of college before entering a dental. A dentist shows X-rays to a patient. There are several areas of specialization for dentists. (Photograph by Kelly A. Quin. Thomson Gale. Reproduced by permission. )college. Most students have at least a bachelor’s degree when they begin dental college. The four-year program at a dental college leads to degrees as either a doctor of dental surgery (DDS) or a doctor of dental medicine (DMD) degree.

Dentists who decide to specialize need from two to four years of further training. II. Specify the source to get the prospective candidate Following DF1, you can undertake DF2 specialist training, a further year of working and training, this time in a hospital setting. This is very relevant if you are considering a future career as a hospital consultant. Courses for specialist qualifications in areas such as orthodontics, implant dentistry and aesthetic dentistry are available. For details, consult the: * Faculty of General Dental Practice (FGDP) * Faculty of Dental Surgery (FDS) British Dental Association (BDA) Getting the Job Most newly licensed dentists enter private practice. Since it is becoming more difficult to open new practices, many dentists start out by working with a dentist who is already established. Other dentists find salaried positions in hospitals or government agencies. Your dental college placement office can give you information on how to begin a practice. EMPLOYER AND VACANCY SOURCE General dental practitioners (GDPs) are either employed as assistants or work as self-employed associates, providing National Health Service (NHS) dental services.

Dental practices vary in size from single practitioner, part-time surgeries to multiple-site partnerships with several associates. Dental treatment may be provided under the NHS or as private care; most dentists run mixed practices. Hospital dentists in the UK are employed in NHS hospital trusts in a variety of dental specialism’s, including paediatric dentistry, orthodontics, oral pathology, restorative dentistry and dental public health. Many of their patients are referred by GDPs. Specialists in oral medicine and oral maxillofacial surgery is doubly qualified in dentistry and medicine.

Hospital dentists see fewer patients than GDPs but cases are more complex. Salaried dentists in the UK have a contract of employment with the Community Dental Service (CDS), known in England as the Salaried Primary Dental Care Service (SPDCS), providing dental care for patients with special needs of various kinds, such as people with disabilities, children, the elderly and the housebound. Salaried dentists work in a variety of clinical settings including health authority surgeries, mobile clinics and residential homes.

Universities with dental schools and teaching hospitals offer dentists the option of combining academic teaching with research to pursue special interests in depth. III. Specify the selection tools for the candidate ( like test, etc) * Outside sources 1. Once qualified, and before being able to practice, dentists must register with the General Dental Council (GDC), the profession’s regulatory body. Dentists must maintain a professional attitude and follow a professional code of ethics in order to maintain registration with the GDC. 2.

The Committee of Postgraduate Dental Deans and Directors (COPDEND) commissions and manages postgraduate dental and medical training for dentists via the dental foundation training programmed. 3. After graduation, if you wish to become a general dental practitioner (GDP) or to work as a junior hospital dentist in the Community Dental Service (CDS) (called the Salaried Primary Dental Care Service (SPDCS) in England), you must complete a one-year programme of dental foundation training (DF1), formally referred to as vocational training (VT), working as a Vocational Dental Practitioner (VDP).

You’ll work within an approved dental practice, which provides the aspects of vocational training that all dentists require if they are to work in The National Health Service (NHS). 4. The training varies by region, VDPs ordinarily work four days a week in the practice, initially under supervision, then increasingly more independently. They learn to manage teams of people by working with dental nurses, receptionists, hygienists and others, and to manage the surgery as a business.

VDPs also attend a day release course of lectures and demonstrations, usually run in the dental departments of hospitals. In some practices, particularly in more rural areas, students will work five days a week in the practice and attend the courses on block release. All students are required to keep a log of their progress and undergo performance appraisals according to set guidelines. IV. Arranges 5 questions for each types of question (situational interview, behavioral interview, job related interview and stress interview) Situational interview 1.

You have just entered Dentistry school and a close family member becomes ill. They live out of province. What do you do? 2. Tell me about a time when your quality of work was not up to par from what was expected from your professor. 3. As a dentist with a private practice clinic, a patient discloses to you that they cannot afford their treatment. What do you do? 4. A patient repeatedly ignores your advice to wear their retainer. What do you do? 5. What should I say to the admissions committee to convince them to accept you? Behavioral interview 1.

You notice a classmate is cheating on an exam. What do you do? 2. Every time you ask as question, the professor ridicules you. What do you do? 3. You are working on a project with a classmate and their quality of work is not up to par. What do you do? 4. What is your greatest failure, and what did you learn from it? 5. Give me an example of a time you did something wrong. How did you handle it? Related interview 1. Describe routine dental treatments. 2. Tell me about experiences you have had in managing difficult patient, parent and staff situations. 3.

What is the future of dentistry? 4. Do you think malpractice can be reduced, and if so, how? 5. Tell me about your observational experiences in a/the dental office. Stress interview 1. How would you respond to someone who said that dentists/doctors make too much money? 2. Do you provide instructions to patients regarding hygiene and health? 3. What is your knowledge of the current technology of dental treatment techniques and oral health care? 4. What is the estimated overhead cost for hygiene per hour? 5. What kinds of people do you find it difficult to work with?

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