Length of Day

Part 1

Places east of longitude 160°W and west of longitude 20°E are illuminated in the views, while those west of longitude 160°W and east of longitude 20°E are not included. On June 21, 2004 and June 21, 2005, 23°27?N (e.g. Havana) is directly below the sun. On September 21, 2004 and March 21, 2005, the equator (e.g. Quito) is directly below the sun. On December 21, 2004, 23°27?S (e.g. Sao Paulo) is directly below the sun. During the equinoxes, the equator (the solid red line) divides the views into two equal halves. During the summer solstices, the equator is at the point of latitude 23°27?S in the view; and during the winter solstice it is at 23°27?N.

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Part 2

As we can see from the red circles, the ratio of the length of arc in the sun-lit area to that of the entire circle represents the relationship between the hours of daylight and the whole day. So we can come to the following conclusions: On Dec. 21, 2004 and Dec. 21, 2005, Iceland had 4 hours of daylight; On Mar. 21, 2005 and Sep. 21, 2005, it had 12 hours of daylight; On June 21, 2005, Iceland received 21 hours of daylight.

Part 3

The following conclusions can be drawn from observations: 1. The atmosphere of regions with lower latitudes receives more solar radiation; 2. As the length of day varies according to the season, the atmosphere receives the largest amount of solar radiation in summer, in spring and fall it receives moderate amount of solar radiation, and in winter it gets the least amount of solar radiation.

Views for Part 1

June 21, 2004 at 16:00.

Havana

Sept. 21, 2004

Quito

Dec. 21, 2004

Sao Paulo

Mar. 21, 2005

Quito

June 21, 2005

Havana

Views for Part 2

Dec. 21, 2004

Mar. 21, 2005

June 21, 2005

Sept. 21, 2005

Dec. 21, 2005

 

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