MA  Constitution

The  Massachusetts  Constitution  of  1780  is  the  oldest  written,  still-governing  constitution  in  the  world.  Yet  it  was  the  last  of  the  original  thirteen  states  to  be  adopted.  It  took  four  years  to  forge  a  document  to  satisfy  the  people  of  Massachusetts.The  process  of  constitution-making  in  Massachusetts  gave  life  to  what  was  then  the  revolutionary  concept  of  “We  the  People,”  a  phrase  traceable  to  the  Preamble  of  the  Massachusetts  Constitution  of  1780  and,  later,  made  famous  as  the  inspirational  first  words  of  the  United  States  Constitution.

In  accordance  with  a  recommendation  of  the  General  Court  adopted  a  form  of  Constitution  “for  the  State  of  Massachusetts  Bay.”  which  was  submitted  to  the  people,  and  by  them  rejected.  This  attempt  to  form  a  Constitution  having  proved  unsuccessful,  the  General  Court  on  the  20th  of  February,  1779,  passed  a  Resolve  calling  upon  the  qualified  voters  to  give  in  their  votes  upon  the  questions  —  Whether  they  chose  to  have  a  new  Constitution  or  Form  of  Government  made,  and,  Whether  they  will  empower  their  representatives  to  vote  for  calling  a  State  Convention  for  that  purpose.  A  large  majority  of  the  inhabitants  having  voted  in  the  affirmative  to  both  these  questions,  the  General  Court,  on  the  17th  of  June,  1779,  passed  a  Resolve  calling  upon  the  inhabitants  to  meet  and  choose  delegates  to  a  Constitutional  Convention,  to  be  held  at  Cambridge,  on  the  1st  of  September,  1779.  The  Convention  met  at  time  and  place  appointed,  and  organized  by  choosing  James  Bowdoin,  President,  and  Samuel  Barrett,  Secretary.  On  the  11th  of  November  the  Convention  adjourned,  to  meet  at  the  Representatives’  Chamber,  in  Boston,  January  5th,  1780.  On  the  2d  of  March,  of  the  same  year,  a  form  of  Constitution  having  been  agreed  upon,  a  Resolve  was  passed  by  which  the  same  was  submitted  to  the  people,  and  the  Convention  adjourned  to  meet  at  the  Brattle  Street  Church,  in  Boston,  June  the  7th.  At  that  time  and  place  the  Convention  again  met,  and  appointed  a  Committee  to  examine  the  returns  of  votes  from  the  several  towns.  On  the  14th  of  June  the  Committee  reported,  and  on  the  15th  the  Convention  resolved,  “That  the  people  of  the  State  of  Massachusetts  Bay  have  accepted  the  Constitution  as  it  stands,  in  the  printed  form  submitted  to  their  revision.”  A  Resolve  providing  for  carrying  the  new  Constitution  into  effect  was  passed;  and  the  Convention  then,  on  the  16th  of  June,  1780,  was  finally  dissolved.  In  accordance  with  the  Resolves  referred  to,  elections  immediately  took  place  in  the  several  towns;  and  the  first  General  Court  of  the  Commonwealth  of  Massachusetts  met  at  the  State  House,  in  Boston,  on  Wednesday,  October  25th,  1780.

Best services for writing your paper according to Trustpilot

Premium Partner
From $18.00 per page
4,8 / 5
4,80
Writers Experience
4,80
Delivery
4,90
Support
4,70
Price
Recommended Service
From $13.90 per page
4,6 / 5
4,70
Writers Experience
4,70
Delivery
4,60
Support
4,60
Price
From $20.00 per page
4,5 / 5
4,80
Writers Experience
4,50
Delivery
4,40
Support
4,10
Price
* All Partners were chosen among 50+ writing services by our Customer Satisfaction Team

The  General  Court  of  the  year  1851  passed  an  Act  calling  a  third  Convention  to  revise  the  Constitution.  The  Act  was  submitted  to  the  people,  and  a  majority  voted  against  the  proposed  Convention.  In  1852,  on  the  7th  of  May,  another  Act  was  passed  calling  upon  the  people  to  vote  upon  the  question  of  calling  a  Constitutional  Convention.  A  majority  of  the  people  having  voted  in  favor  of  the  proposed  Convention,  election  for  delegates  thereto  took  place  in  March,  1853.  The  Convention  met  in  the  State  House,  in  Boston,  on  the  4th  day  of  May,  1853,  and  organized  by  choosing  Nathaniel  P.  Banks,  Jr.,  President,  and  William  S.  Robinson  and  James  T.  Robinson,  Secretaries.  On  the  1st  of  August,  this  Convention  agreed  to  a  form  of  Constitution,  and  on  the  same  day  was  dissolved,  after  having  provided  for  submitting  the  same  to  the  people,  and  appointed  a  committee  to  meet  to  count  the  votes,  and  to  make  a  return  thereof  to  the  General  Court.  The  Committee  met  at  the  time  and  place  agreed  upon,  and  found  that  the  proposed  Constitution  had  been  rejected.

In  his  inaugural  address  to  the  General  Court  of  1916,  Governor  McCall  recommended  that  the  question  of  revising  the  Constitution,  through  a  Constitutional  Convention,  be  submitted  to  the  people;  and  the  General  Court  passed  a  law  (chapter  98  of  the  General  Acts  of  1916)  to  ascertain  and  carry  out  the  will  of  the  people  relative  thereto,  the  question  to  be  submitted  being  “Shall  there  be  a  convention  to  revise,  alter  or  amend  the  constitution  of  the  Commonwealth?”  The  people  voted  on  this  question  at  the  annual  election,  held  on  November  7,  casting  217,293  votes  in  the  affirmative  and  120,979  votes  in  the  negative;  and  accordingly  the  Governor  on  Dec.  19,  1916,  made  proclamation  to  that  effect,  and,  by  virtue  of  authority  contained  in  the  act,  called  upon  the  people  to  elect  delegates  at  a  special  election  to  be  held  on  the  first  Tuesday  in  May,  1917.  The  election  was  on  May  1.  In  accordance  with  the  provisions  of  the  act,  the  delegates  met  at  the  State  House  on  June  6,  1917,  and  organized  by  choosing  John  L.  Bates,  president,  and  James  W.  Kimball,  secretary.  After  considering  and  acting  adversely  on  numerous  measures  that  had  been  brought  before  it,  and  after  providing  for  submitting  to  the  people  the  forty-fifth,  forty-sixth,  and  forty-seventh  Articles,  at  the  state  election  of  1917,  and  the  Article  relative  to  the  establishment  of  the  popular  initiative  and  referendum  and  the  legislative  initiative  of  specific  amendments  of  the  Constitution  (Article  forty-eight)  at  the  state  election  of  1918,  the  Convention  adjourned  on  November  28  “until  called  by  the  President  or  Secretary  to  meet  not  later  than  within  ten  days  after  the  prorogation  of  the  General  Court  of  1918.”

On  Wednesday,  June  12,  1918,  the  convention  reassembled  and  resumed  its  work.  Eighteen  more  articles  (Articles  forty-nine  to  sixty-six,  inclusive)  were  approved  by  the  convention  and  were  ordered  to  be  submitted  to  the  people.  On  Wednesday,  August  21,  1918,  the  convention  adjourned,  “to  meet,  subject  to  call  by  the  President  or  Secretary,  not  later  than  within  twenty  days  after  the  prorogation  of  the  General  Court  of  1919,  for  the  purpose  of  taking  action  on  the  report  of  the  special  committee  on  Rearrangement  of  the  Constitution.”

On  Tuesday,  August  12,  1919,  pursuant  to  a  call  of  its  President,  the  Convention  again  convened.  A  rearrangement  of  the  Constitution  was  adopted,  and  was  ordered  to  be  submitted  to  the  people  for  their  ratification.  On  the  following  day,  a  subcommittee  of  the  Special  Committee  on  Rearrangement  of  the  Constitution  was  “empowered  to  correct  clerical  and  typographical  errors  and  establish  the  text  of  the  rearrangement  of  the  Constitution  to  be  submitted  to  the  people,  in  conformity  with  that  adopted  by  the  Convention.”  On  Wednesday,  August  13,  1919,  the  Convention  adjourned,  sine  die.  On  Tuesday,  November  4,  1919,  the  rearrangement  was  approved  and  ratified  by  the  people.
The  sixty-seventh  Article  of  Amendment  was  adopted  by  the  General  Court  during  the  sessions  of  the  years  1920  and  1921,  and  was  approved  and  ratified  by  the  people  on  the  7th  day  of  November,  1922.

Law  of  enforcement:

 Effective  law  enforcement  executives  lead  both  by  example  and  by  setting  clear  expectations  for  the  behavior  of  those  who  serve  under  them.  The  first  step  in  establishing  an  effective  intradepartmental  response  to  domestic  violence  involves  the  leader  demonstrating  intolerance  for  such  behavior,  speaking  out  against  it,  and  standing  as  an  advocate  for  those  who  are  harmed  by  it.  Leaders’  public  policies,  established  for  enforcement  by  the  officers  in  their  communities,  must  remain  consistent  with  those  that  they  establish  for  their  law  enforcement  personnel.

Keeping  all  of  this  in  mind,  law  enforcement  administrators  must  explore  ways  of  helping  their  employees  avoid  violence  in  their  personal  relationships.  To  have  an  effective  approach  to  officer-involved  domestic  violence,  managers  must  begin  with—

a  good  understanding  of  the  dynamics  of  domestic  violence  and  the  magnitude  of  the  problem, a  commitment  to  addressing  the  problem  and  the  support  of  other  top  members  in  doing  so,  an  ability  to  create  a  culture  of  disapproval  of  abusive  behavior  and  the  means  to  communicate  that  position;  and  the  resources  to  follow  through  on  the  commitment.

The  law  enforcement  community  must  unite  in  an  effort  to  eradicate  such  behavior  from  its  ranks  not  only  to  restore  the  public’s  faith  and  trust  in  the  profession  but,  more  important,  to  show  that  it  will  not  tolerate  such  actions  by  any  individual,  regardless  of  position  or  authority.  Law  enforcement  agencies  can  implement  several  strategies  to  combat  domestic  violence  in  their  ranks.  Most  require  a  comprehensive  approach  that  includes  effective  leadership,  recruitment  screening,  straightforward  policies  and  procedures,  appropriate  training,  and  efficient  violation  investigation  and  response.  By  incorporating  such  actions  into  their  daily  efforts,  agencies  can  safeguard  its  members  and  their  families  from  the  toll  that  domestic  violence  takes  on  the  law  enforcement  community  and  the  citizens  it  serves.  Differences  in  the  size,  type,  and  location  of  law  enforcement  agencies  allow  for  only  general  recommendations  and  guidelines  regarding  the  safe  use  of  vehicles  in  law  enforcement.  Therefore,  agencies  should  research  and  analyze  what  is  occurring  within  their  own  departments.  Agencies  of  any  size  might  benefit  from  developing  a  working  relationship  with  local  colleges,  universities,  and  technical  institutes  to  collect  and  analyze  various  aspects  of  the  complex  phenomenon  of  accidental  deaths  in  law  enforcement.  Such  institutions  may  have  fresh  and  innovative  insights  into  this  problem.  The  more  information  gathered  and  analyzed,  the  greater  the  likelihood  that  appropriate  and  applicable  answers  may  be  found  and,  ultimately,  result  in  lives  saved.

When  law  enforcement  officers  die  in  the  performance  of  their  duties,  their  agencies,  their  families  and  fellow  officers,  and  the  communities  they  serve  suffer  greatly.  While  those  deaths  attributed  to  criminals  represent  truly  tragic  occurrences,  those  caused  by  accidents,  especially  vehicle  accidents,  often  create  the  additional  heartache  of  unresolved  issues  about  the  reasons  for  these  incidents.  In  the  former,  agencies  capture  the  offenders  and  the  court  system  renders  justice.  In  the  latter,  who  resolves  an  “accident?”  The  officer  is  just  as  dead;  the  family  is  just  as  devastated;  the  loss  is  just  as  tragic,  perhaps  even  more  so  because  it  may  have  been  preventable.

Everyone  within  the  law  enforcement  community  hopes  that  the  day  will  arrive  when  felonious  killings,  serious  assaults,  and  accidental  deaths  are  only  a  part  of  law  enforcement’s  history.  However,  realistically,  the  profession  accepts  the  sad,  but  inevitable,  reality  that  deaths  and  assaults  will  continue  to  occur.  Although  they  may  continue,  law  enforcement  agencies,  local  governments,  civic  groups,  and  academic  institutions  can  work  toward  reducing  their  number  by  analyzing  past  incidents,  developing  new  training  procedures,  and  reminding  officers  of  the  dangers  inherent  in  the  profession.  The  dedicated  men  and  women  of  law  enforcement  who  tirelessly  serve  and  protect  the  public  deserve  no  less.

REFERENCE:

1.      www.usconstitution.net/constnotes.

2.      www.mass.gov/courts/sjc/constitution

x

Hi!
I'm Niki!

Would you like to get a custom essay? How about receiving a customized one?

Check it out