, Research Paper

RESPONSE TO HUCKLEBERRY FINN: Chapters 19-26

With this following ball of the novel begins a series of great cheats which Huck finds himself involved in when he and Jim meet up with the? Duke of Bridgewater? and? Looy the Seventeenth, rightful King of France? . The two con-artists lead Huck and Jim from town to town with a new cozenage every clip, while our two chief characters wait on them manus and pes. However, in the thick of all this eccentric fraudery, Mark Twain manages to show some really powerful truths about human nature.

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The first cozenage leads us to a cantonment meeting in the little town of Pokeville, where a type of spiritual resurgence has commenced. Taking advantage of the bully unrestrained atmosphere of the meeting, the male monarch creates a pathetic narrative, claiming to be a deplorable plagiarist who, thanks to bivouac Pokeville, has seen the visible radiation and is ready to atone and purge himself of his wickednesss. He goes on to province that he will draw a bead on to assist all plagiarists in the Indian ocean to alter their wicked ways, though it might take him ages since he was hard up. Of class, the fleeceable crowd believes his every word and starts up a aggregation box to raise money for the hapless disadvantaged plagiarist, handling him as though he were a hero.

Here, Twain makes a statement about the prevalence of ignorance amongst worlds and their reactions to that of which ignorant. They are impressed by the strangeness of the? plagiarist? , and one time they see that his alien has merrily adapted to their ways, they are flattered and the facet of insecurity disappears. Brush off by this, they allow themselves to be conned out of their money in the name of charity.

The following cheat occurs in Bricksville, Arkansas, a creaky unenrgetic town of quibbling idlers and rummies. Huck finds himself the informant to a slaying when one of the town drunks ignores a warning given to him by Colonel Sherburn, a degage citizen of Bricksville. After Sherburn shoots the ill-famed rummy, the whole town gathers around and threatens to lynch Sherburn. At this point, Sherburn makes a forceful address showing his positions and sentiments of the community. Twain takes this chance to talk through Sherburn, associating his ain positions to the reader about American society.

Unlike the disclosure of the? plagiarist? in the old con, Sherburn ne’er adapted to the ways of the society, as he didn? t happen them to be up to his criterions, therefore the people felt intimidated by him. He realizes that the menace of lynching by the citizens of Bricksville are is unsubstantial because they are weak. They think that the menace entirely proves that they have bravery, and yet had they been entirely, they would ne’er hold stood up to Sherburn. He asserts that strength doesn? t prevarication in Numberss, it lies within. He so relates this thought to society on a more general degree by stating in chap.22, ? The pitifulest thing out is

a rabble ; that? s what an ground forces is? a rabble ; they don? t battle with bravery that? s born in them, but with bravery that? s borrowed organize their mass, and from their officers. ? . Couple mocks the thought of? weather America? by saying that the mean adult male is a coward. The media pounds it into them that they are all so courageous and strong, when in world, they are all timid and insecure push-overs, concealing under the bravery of those in charge, and under a cover of false pretensions.

Another subject which Twain encoorporates into the scene is that of human insensitiveness and inhuman treatment. After the slaying, the town caputs off to the circus where a? drunken adult male? efforts to seek to sit one of the circus Equus caballuss. Alternatively of the crowd screening concern for the well being of the adult male, they laughed and jeered like loony. Huck? s attitude differs to that of the crowd when he says, ? It warn? t good story to me, though ; I was all of a tremble to see his danger. ? . Couple nowadayss Huck as an person, different from the mean member of society. He really found the state of affairs alarming, whereas the others found it exhaustively entertaining. The circus used humanity? s deficiency of compassion to their advantage, and appealed to it by including such a section in their attractive force.

The concluding fraud for this subdivision of the book occurs when the four traveling comrades offer a lift to a immature adult male they meet on the river bank. The immature adult male tells the two criminals about a decease which had occurred in his small town and how the helpers of the adult male? s, his two brothers, will hold non yet shown up form England. The King sees an chance for a new cozenage and inquiries the immature adult male to no terminal so that he might get a good back land of the dead adult male.

He so uses his new found cognition to flim-flam the people of the small town into believing that he and the duke are the relations of the hapless dead Peter Wilks. Yet once more, the two manage to utilize the ignorance and credulousness of the people to their advantage, as they put on a fantastic show of emotion. They even throw in small supernumeraries to do their act more credible, such as in chapter 25 when they offer the entire amount of hard currency which they receive from their heritage to their nieces, stating that they are non about to? rob? yes, rob? sech hapless sweet lambs as these? at he ( Peter Wilks ) loved so at sech a clip? , cognizing that they would do even more money by selling the belongings and retainers. Once more, Twain emphasizes the connexion between offense and ignorance, and how the two con-artists are continuously successful due to the fact that they know how to profit from the people? s ignorance. As the King says in chapter 26, ? Hain? T we got all the saps in town on our side? And ain? T that a large adequate bulk in any town? ? .

Therefore far, the novel had proved to be an entertaining series of escapades and brushs, sprinkled with deeper significances and profound penetrations to human nature.

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