Soliloquoy From Henry IV Essay, Research Paper

William Shakespeare & # 8217 ; s Henry IV, Part II, contains a monologue in which King Henry grieves over his trouble kiping. Shakespeare illustrates the King & # 8217 ; s contemplations through keen enunciation, imagination, and sentence structure. These literary elements efficaciously demonstrate the King & # 8217 ; s province of head.

King Henry & # 8217 ; s demeanour as he gives this monologue is one of great hurt and sadness. In this monologue, the King has a conversation with slumber in which he complains that slumber & # 8221 ; . . . no more wilt weigh [ his ] palpebras down. . . & # 8221 ; ( cubic decimeter, 5 ) that is, he can non kip. He besides protests that slumber will & # 8220 ; liest. . . in the smoky cot, upon uneasy palettes. . . & # 8221 ; ( ll, 7-8 ) . Here he notes that slumber comes to the poorest of his topics and to the filthiest of houses. Next he wonders why slumber will & # 8220 ; liest. . . with the vile in nauseating beds. . . & # 8221 ; ( ll, 12-13 ) and non come prevarication on & # 8221 ; . . . the kingly couch. . . & # 8221 ; ( cubic decimeter, 13 ) . The concluding contrast presented in the monologue is that of a sea-boy, who despite the & # 8221 ; . . . rude disdainful rush. . . & # 8221 ; ( cubic decimeter, 17 ) of the ocean gets sleep. Meanwhile, the King, on the & # 8221 ; . . . calmest and most inactive dark. . . & # 8221 ; ( cubic decimeter, 25 ) lies restlessly in bed. In the pair of this sonnet, King Henry resigns himself to his wakefulness in saying that & # 8220 ; Uneasy lies the caput that wears a crown. & # 8221 ; This alludes to the great affairs which frequently keep a swayer from slumber.

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As most Shingles

pearean poetry, this monologue is full with affecting enunciation, enrapturing imagination, and refined sentence structure. The enunciation in this sonnet symbolizes the turbulency and convulsion impacting the King. His insomnia greatly distresses the King. He wants sleep so he may ” . . . steep [ his ] senses in forgetfulness. . . ” ( cubic decimeter, 5 ) and leave behind the concerns of the monarchy. In line 12, King Henry references “O thou dull God. . . ” whereby he alludes to Morpheus the Greek God of slumber, to whom he is talking throughout the address. In fact, this peculiar monologue is an drawn-out apostrophe wherein the King converses with the personified construct of ’sleep.’ Within this address Shakespeare uses imagination to excite the senses of sound and odor. Despite the sound of ” . . . bombinating night-flies. . . ” ( cubic decimeter, 8 ) and the feel of ” . . . nauseating beds. . . ” ( cubic decimeter, 13 ) the poorest peasant discoveries sleep. However, the King with the ” . . . sound of sweetest tune. . .” ( cubic decimeter, 11 ) heard in ” . . . perfum’d Chamberss. . .” ( cubic decimeter, 9 ) remains uneasy. The sentence construction of this monologue is characteristic of the personage in that the lines are drawn-out and luxuriant. This serves to show the intelligence and poise of the King. As is typical of all sonnets, this monologue ends with a riming pair.

This monologue from Henry IV, Part II portrays Shakespeare & # 8217 ; s great ability as a poet. It efficaciously shows his usage of assorted literary elements in order to exemplify his significance.

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